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Multiculturalismo e imigração

por Samuel de Paiva Pires, em 12.02.17

Scruton - How to be a Conservative.jpg

 Roger Scruton, How to Be a Conservative (London: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2014), 90-92:

 

Once we distinguish race and culture, the way is open to acknowledge that not all cultures are equally admirable, and that not all cultures can exist comfortably side by side. To deny this is to forgo the very possibility of moral judgement, and therefore to deny the fundamental experience of community. It is precisely this that has caused the multiculturalists to hesitate. It is culture, not nature, that tells a family that their daughter who has fallen in love outside the permitted circle must be killed, that girls must undergo genital mutilation if they are to be respectable, that the infidel must be destroyed when Allah commands it. You can read about those things and think they belong to the pre-history of our world. But when suddenly they are happening in your midst, you are apt to wake up to the truth about the culture that advocates them. You are apt to say, that is not our culture, and it has no business here. And you will probably be tempted to go one stage further, the stage that the Enlightenment naturally invites, and to say that it has no business anywhere.

 

For what is brought home to us, through painful experiences that we might have avoided had it been permitted before now to say the truth, is that we, like everyone else, depend upon a shared culture for our security, our prosperity and our freedom to be. We don’t require everyone to have the same faith, to lead the same kind of family life or to participate in the same festivals. But we have a shared civic culture, a shared language and a shared public sphere. Our societies are built upon the Judaeo-Christian ideal of neighbour-love, according to which strangers and intimates deserve equal concern. They require each of us to respect the freedom and sovereignty of every person, and to acknowledge the threshold of privacy beyond which it is a trespass to go unless invited. Our societies depend upon law-abidingness and open contracts, and they reinforce these things through the educational traditions that have shaped our common curriculum. It is not an arbitrary cultural imperialism that leads us to value Greek philosophy and literature, the Hebrew Bible, Roman law, and the medieval epics and romances and to teach these things in our schools. They are ours in just the way that the legal order and the political institutions are ours: they form part of what made us, and convey the message that it is right to be what we are. And reason endorses these things, and tells us that our civic culture is not just a parochial possession of inward-looking communities, but a justified way of life.

 

Over time, immigrants can come to share these things with us: the experience of America bears ample witness to this. And they more easily do so when they recognize that, in any meaningful sense of the word, our culture is also a multi-culture, incorporating elements absorbed in ancient times from all around the Mediterranean basin and in modern times from the adventures of European traders and explorers across the world. But this kaleidoscopic culture is still one thing, with a set of inviolable principles at its core; and it is the source of social cohesion across Europe and America. Our culture allows for a great range of ways of life; it enables people to privatize their religion and their family customs, while still belonging to the public realm of open dealings and shared allegiance. For it defines that public realm in legal and territorial terms, and not in terms of creed or kinship.

 

So what happens when people whose identity is fixed by creed or kinship immigrate into places settled by Western culture? The activists say that we must make room for them, and that we do this by relinquishing the space in which their culture can flourish. Our political class has at last recognized that this is a recipe for disaster, and that we can welcome immigrants only if we welcome them into our culture, and not beside or against it. But that means telling them to accept rules, customs and procedures that may be alien to their old way of life. Is this an injustice? I do not think that it is. If immigrants come it is because they gain by doing so. It is therefore reasonable to remind them that there is also a cost. Only now, however, is our political class prepared to say so, and to insist that cost be paid.

 

(também publicado aqui.)

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publicado às 14:10


3 comentários

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De Ricardo a 12.02.2017 às 15:52

Eu acho é que a classe política em boa parte ainda não percebeu bem o que andou a promover(sempre em nome das igualdades e liberdades). Sugiro https://www.rtp.pt/play/p2043/e273269/o-principio-da-incerteza
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De Nuno Castelo-Branco a 12.02.2017 às 20:29

Genericamente de acordo. Sabes bem o que penso acerca da (não) posição do mainstream a respeito deste assunto, entremeado de causas que dnotam a rendição pela cobardia. Vendo bem os factos como se apresentam, é isto mesmo: rendição.
 O primado da Lei com que andaram  a acenar durante os últimos dois séculos, agora é posto de lado e estão abertos a "novas" experiências que a meu ver, nos remetem para os cristãos d'El Rei, os mouros d'El Rei e os judeus d'El Rei, ou seja, ordenamentos paralelos que abrem ou melhor,e scancaram as portas a tudo e mais alguma coisa. É inaceitável, pois colide com qualquer tipo de Constituição escrita ou de direito consuetudinário em qualquer um dos países europeus, de Lisboa a Moscovo. 
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De Anónimo a 12.02.2017 às 21:45

Nos idos do pré-Abril circulavam umas caixas de fósferos com uma legenda ... comprava um automóvel a este ?.... A História repete-se. Não se aprendeu nada.

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