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Quando o partidarismo se sobrepõe ao interesse nacional

por Samuel de Paiva Pires, em 09.06.17

Jamelle Bouie, "Who Needs Rule of Law?":

Just one of our two parties is interested in checking this president’s abuse. The other, the Republican Party, is indifferent, content to tolerate Trump’s misconduct as long as it doesn’t interrupt or interfere with its political agenda. What defined Thursday’s hearing, in fact, was the degree to which Republicans downplayed obvious examples of bad—potentially illegal—behavior and sought to exonerate Trump rather than grapple with Comey’s damning allegations about the president. Sen. James Risch of Idaho, for example, pressed Comey on his claim that President Trump had asked the then–FBI director to drop the investigation into Flynn, suggesting that—because Trump didn’t give a direct order—we ought to ignore the clear subtext of the president’s statement. Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma described Trump’s actions on behalf of Flynn as a “light touch.” Other Republican committee members, like Sens. John Cornyn of Texas and John McCain of Arizona, steered the conversation toward the FBI’s investigation of Hillary Clinton’s private email server. Still others, like Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, defended Trump’s actions, blasting leaks to the press as efforts to undermine his administration.

 

Republican committee members were aided in all of this by the official organs of the GOP, which treated the hearings as a distraction—a partisan frivolity driven by Democrats and the press. “Director Comey’s opening statement confirms he told President Trump three times that he was not under investigation,” said a statement from the Republican National Committee that recommended a strategy of deflection. The RNC additionally argued that “Director Comey lost confidence of both sides of the aisle, and the president was justified in firing him.” House Speaker Paul Ryan, commenting on the procedures, defended Trump’s potentially illegal behavior as the mistakes of a novice. “He’s just new to this, and probably wasn’t steeped in long-running protocols,” he said.

 

(...).

 

James Comey’s sworn Senate testimony, both written and spoken, is evidence of one political crisis: A president with little regard for rule of law who sees no problem in bringing his influence and authority to bear on federal investigations. The Republican reaction—the effort to protect Trump and discredit Comey—is evidence of another: a crisis of ultra-partisanship, where the nation’s governing party has opted against oversight and accountability, abdicating its role in our system of checks and balances and allowing that president free rein, as long as he signs its legislation and nominates its judges.

 

Americans face two major crises, each feeding into the other. Republicans aren’t bound to partisan loyalty. They can choose country over party, rule of law over ideology. But they won’t, and the rest of us will pay for it.

 

(também publicado aqui.)

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De JS a 09.06.2017 às 23:39

O recém eleito PR dos EUA tem uma conversa telefonica, privada, com o PR do México. Transcrições da conversa -que apouca os PRs- aparecem no dia seguinte num orgão da informção da oposição. Repetem-se incidentes semelhantes.

O PR dos EUA convoca, óbviamente, o #1 da polícias de investigação (FBI) e constata imediantemente que este tem a sua própria (paranoica) agenda, assaz inclinada. Pró-oposição.
Dá-lhe oportunidade, a custo. A responsabilidade de o manter no cargo é do PR. (Ariquivar, sem ter poder para tal, uma investigaçaõ sobre Hillary é sintomático).
...
Não aceitaria semelhante personagem em nenhum cargo, mesmo que menor. Trump também não.

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